Wednesday, May 22, 2019

All About New Echota, Georgia #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

All About New Echota

Council HouseBefore New Echota was settled the seat of the Cherokee tribe was located at Ustanali on the Coosawattee River which was established ca 1777 by refugees from the Cherokee Lower Towns in northwestern South Carolina after the murder of Old Tassel and other chiefs while on an embassy to the State of Franklin. Little Turkey was elected chief of the Cherokee and the seat of the Cherokee council was removed from Chota to Ustanali. New Echota (named after Choata) was the capital of the Cherokee Nation from 1825 to their forced removal in the 1830s. Today, the site is a State Park and Historic Site which is located North of Calhoun and South of Resaca, Georgia. It is situated at the confluence of the Coosawattee and Conasauga River, a tributary of the Coosa River. The tribal council also began a building program that included construction of a two-story Council House, a Supreme Court, and later the office (printer shop) of the first Indian language and Cherokee newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix. The editor and printer, Elias Boudinot wrote the newspaper in the Cherokee language. The Cherokee Phoenix.Issues of this newspaper are available at most regional libraries in Georgia on microfilm. After the Congressional passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1832, Georgia included Cherokee territory in its Sixth Land Lottery, allocating Cherokee land to white settlers. The Cherokee Nation had never ceded the land to the state. Over the next six years, the Georgia Guard operated against the Cherokee, evicting them from their properties. By 1834, New Echota was becoming a ghost town. Council meetings were moved to Red Clay, Cherokee Nation (now Tennessee). The United States urged the Cherokee to remove to Indian Territory, in exchange for their lands in Georgia. It has been my experience in researching Cherokee heritages that all Cherokees were not removed from North Georgia. The applications of Indian descendants in Georgia to the Dawes Commission (to be awarded free Oklahoma land) reflect some interesting details. Although only a small portion of these applicants succeeded in proving as much as 1/32nd blood descent, those who did succeed traced themselves to one or more of the Indian Rolls. This is the key. Tribes kept Rolls, beginning about 1818, with the names of natives. The Cherokee Census and other records assist the genealogists. A list of the records available on Georgia Pioneers are listed here



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Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Names of Georgia Ancestors --- > Gordon County


Gordon County Genealogy, Wills, Estates


Gordon County

Gordon County was created on Feb. 13, 1850 and was formed formed from portions of Cass (later renamed Bartow) and Floyd counties. All lands that would become Gordon County were originally occupied by the Cherokee Indians. Early Settlers: John Armstrong, John Atchison, John Baugh, W. N. Blalock, William J. Campbell, R. A. Donaldson, John Dobbins, T. M. Ellis, H. T. Ferguson, Frank Ford, Mountain Greason, Samuel Hurt, W. S. Johnson, W. B. Jackson, John King, B. R. Mayes, R. L. Norrell, Wiley Roberts, M. G. Scott, John Sloan, John Taylor, and W. T. Wofford. 

Gordon County Genealogy Resources Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Online Images of Wills 1856 to 1894

Testators: Abbott, Elizabeth;Adcox, Wilson;Akin, homas;Armstrong, John H.; Atherton, Ann;Atkinson, John; Bagwell, Mary;Bailey, Amelia;Ballew, Joshua;Barrett, D. B.; Baxter, Benjamin;Bennett, A. L. ;Black, Zachariah;Blalock, W. H.; Bolding, Benjamin; Borders, Andrew;Borders, Randolph;Boston, G. W.;Bowen, Israel;Bradley, John; Burnett, Agness Terrell;Buckner, J. B.; Burch, William W.;Butler, Absalom;Byram, H. C.;Callaghan, Cornelius;Campbell, Joseph;Campfield, Rebecca;Campfield, Sarah;Campbell, W. J.;Cantrell, James A.;Chastain, John ;Daniel, Tilman;Darnell. A. J.; Dillard, William;Dobbins, John;Durham, Lavina;Dye, Margarett E.;Ferguson, John; Fite, Nancy;Fricks, Michael;Gaines, Elizabeth;Ganaway, Thomas;Garlington, Eliza; Gold, Sterling;Grant, Sarah;Grant, Tams;Gravitt, John;Greason, Mountain;Hall, Thomas;Haynes, John ; Hays, Sarah;Henson, Presley;Hood, R. D., Mrs.;Houk, H. B.;Hunt, Ann J.;Hunt, Samuel;Jackson, Edmund Calaway;Jarrett, William;Jennings, James;Johnson, James; King, William;Kinman, Wesley;Mayfield, Alexander;Miller, Ann;Miller, Jesse;Monroe, Joseph;Moss, James;Moss, Nicholas;Murphree, Modama;Nelson, Thomas S.;Niggins, Margaret;Noblet, John;Phillips, James;Pike, I. M.;Printup, Joseph J.;Putnam, Elias; Reeves, James;Rich, William;Robbins, Jeremiah;Roe, S. H.;Scott, Thomas D.;Scott, William;Sexton, Morgan;Sloan, John;Stagg, James;Strickland, Ephraim;Strickland, Sally; Swain, Jesse;Tabe, Abraham;Taylor, John;Thomas, Elizabeth;Thompson, Matthew;Tweedell, N. E. ;Veal, John;Walker, C. L.;Walker, Wells;Walker, William;Watts, Mary;Wilson, Elizabeth;Wilson, Joseph

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Estates and Wills, Bk A, 1856-1894.
  • Estates and Wills, Bk B, 1894-1931


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Monday, May 20, 2019

Names of NC Ancestors - - -> Rowan County #ncgenealogy #northcarolinaancestorscom

Rowan County Wills and Estates

Kerr MillThe first Europeans to enter what is now Rowan County came with the Spanish expedition of Juan Pardo in 1567. They established a fort and a mission in the native village of Guatari, believed to be located near the Yadkin River and inhabited by the Wateree. At the time, the area was ruled by a female chief the Spaniards called Guatari Mico. Rockingham County was formed in 1753 from the northern part of Anson County. It was named for Matthew Rowan, acting governor of North Carolina from 1753 to 1754.During 1770 the eastern part of it was combined with the western part of Orange County to become Guilford County, North Carolina. In 1771 the northeastern part of what remained of Rowan County became Surry County. In 1777 the western part of Rowan County became Burke County. In 1788 the western part of the now much smaller Rowan County became Iredell County. In 1822 the eastern part of the still shrinking county became Davidson County. Finally, in 1836 the part of Rowan County north of the South Yadkin River became Davie County. Many of the Rowan County records, wills, estates, etc. are intact. It is usually researched in conjunction with Surry, Burke and Iredell Counties. Some of the earliest settlers were: Henry Aginder, Erasmus Allen, Thomas Braly, William Barr, Daniel Bates, Henry Bruner, William Bartholomew, Michael Cove, Alex Carruth, Nathan Dicks, Hannel Edwards, George Erwin, Peter Fox, Stephen Glandon, John Holmes, Robert Johnson, Peter King, Peter Lawrence, Andrew Maden, Joshua Nichols, William Ogburn, William Porter, David Rothera, and John Thompson.

Rowan County Wills and other Records Available to Members of North Carolina Pioneers

Miscellaneous Wills

  • Reid, Alexander, LWT (1775)
  • Reid, Samuel, LWT (1784)

Images of Wills and Estates, Book A, 1762 to 1780

Aiken, James | Andrews, David | Archbald, William | Baker, Absalom | Baker, Samuel | Ballie, Johnl | Barr, William | Bartholomew, William | Bates, Daniel | Beck, Jacob Sr. | Beesle, Paul | Boonacker, Michael | Bowden, Benjamin | Brandon, George | Brittain, Joseph | Broninger, Adam | Broom, Elizabeth | Brown, James | Brown, William | Bruner, Henry | Bryan, Morgan | Buis, William | Carmichael, John | Carson, James | Carson, William | Carter, James | Cathey, James | Cathey, John | Cathey, Maximillian | Clements, John | Cochran, Samuel | Cochran, Sarah | Coles, William Temple | Coon, Michel | Cowder, John | Cox, Moses | Cressonell, Isaac | Cuistion, James | Cunningham, John | Carruth, Walter | Curry, Nathaniel | Davison, George | Davies, James | Davis, John | Demmitt, James | Denny, William | Dicks, Nathan | Dorsey, Endyman | Edwards, Hamuel | Erwin, James | Esleven, William | Feafer, Nicholas Finey, Janet | Flemon, Peter | Forbis, George | Forgery, Samuel | Foy, Mark | Frey, Peter | Garrett, John | Gibson, Alexander | Gibson, Hugh | Goss, Joseph | Gitchey, John | Hall, John | Hallum, John Sr. | Hamton, David | Harford, Nicholas Henry, Thomas | Hill, David | Hincline, John | Hinkle, Peter | Holmes, John | Houston, Davis | Humphreys, Johannah | Hunt, Thomas | Hunter, Agnes | Husley, Joachim | Jamieson, James | Johnson, Robert | Johnston, Thomas | Jones, Samuel | King, Peter | Knox, Jeane | Laird, Nathaniel | Lambe, Henry | Lambly, George | Lawson, Hugh | Linkens, Jacob | Littel, John | Little, Daniel | Lott, Henry | Lovewater, Josef | Lowrance, Peter | Lowrence, Peter (1768)| Luckie, Robert | Lusk, Samuel | Mabry, George | McCleland, Nicholas | McClellen, William | McConnel,, Andrew . . . more . . .



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Did your Ancestors Migrate to Alabama, Mississippi or Louisiana? #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

Did your Ancestors Migrate to Alabama, Mississippi or Louisiana?

Map of West GeorgiaIf they did, they probably went first to reside in one of the West Georgia counties. That is because the Treaties with the Indians were still being implemented during 1834. First they crossed the Alabama border and made homes around Chambers County. The drive westward was fraught with trial and error as mule train companies plodded along.



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Names of Georgia Ancestors --- > Heard County

Heard County Wills, Estates, Marriages

Heard County

Genealogists should search in Heard, Haralson, Meriwether and Troup Counties, Georgia as families moved westward, afterwards leaving Georgia and going into Chambers County, Alabama (and adjoining counties) and Mississippi. Heard County was created in 1830 from the counties of Carroll, Coweta, and Troup. The court house burned in 1893, destroying all of the records.

Heard County Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages

  • Index to Marriages 1886 to 1906

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Wills (1894-1930) Book I.
  • Inventories and Appraisements (1894-1920)

Online Images of Wills (1894-1900)

Testators: Ashley, Martha; Adams, Kinion; Awtry, Marshall; Brittain, J. H.; Carnes, Sarah; Cline, L. D.; Copeland, Minnie; Daniel, J. H.; Daniel, John; Edwards, Mordecai; Faver, Sanders; Foster, Elizabeth; Glenn, George; Hightower, John; Jackson, Josiah; Johnson, Ruth; Miller, John; Person, Mike; Pulliam, Joseph; Purgason, John; Ridley, Alis; Simms, William; Tompkins, Nicholas; Whitaker, J. J.; Wood, P. H. 

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Wednesday, May 15, 2019

The Destruction of Home and Hearth #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The Destruction of Home and Hearth after the Wars

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin St. John's Episcopal Church

Did you know that during the Revolutionary War that tombstones in local cemeteries were vandalized? In Virginia, St. John's Episcopal Church in the village of Chuckatuck was thoroughly vandalized after the war, and tombstones of Loyalists removed! The church has stood for some 375 years and served as one of three parish houses in old Nansemond County. Englishmen were required to attend church, pay tithing (in tobacco), work on roads, and perform other church services. Virginians were industrious sorts, more interested in their tobacco crops than community worship service. In fact, they spent more money on the out buildings and crops than they did the actual manor house. This could provide one reason for the vandalizing, plus the cruelties imposed by the British and dire economic effects during British occupation. Whatever the reason much is lost. But so much more worse than the war as being a reason to vandalize, are the hateful groups of protesters today who know nothing of the past and destroy the monumental records of former generations. . . . more . . .



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Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Our Disappearing Reality #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Our Disappearing Reality

the cloudSince July 20, 1960 when the US landed on the Moon, technology has beget advances such as the Internet and the massive sharing of genealogies . Although the Moon project was discontinued in the years which followed, it was due more to lack of funding than anything else. American political figures discontinued funding and seemed to fall into a deep unimaginative sleep. As genealogists, we should look ahead and prepare for any upturns or downturns in future events by preserving our own pedigree charts and family histories. Remember when the Family Bible preserved vital information such as births, deaths, marriages? That day is past. All things change. The music which we saved on vinyl records, LPs and CDs, are becoming lost to us. Sure, you may have some relics, but the up and coming generation is easily streaming music and using their voices to command Alexa to deliver music, turn on the lamps in our living rooms, order packages from Amazon, etc. And on it goes. The care which our ancestors took in preserving data did not escape destruction in court house fires, nor the War of 1812 wherein many census records and other data was destroyed by the British. Today, we may retain information in the cloud, Internet and on our personal computer. Perhaps we think this is our permanent copy. But let us dip back in time a bit, and create some paper copies. Perhaps put them inside a safety deposit box at the bank? Remember. What we know today could be our disappearing reality, the same as all generations who lived before us experienced change. If we have the technology to change the way of doing things, even colonize the Moon and Mars. It will happen.



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Monday, May 13, 2019

The 1799 Pilgrimage of Shoal Creek Church #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

The 1799 Pilgrimage of Shoal Creek Church

Tugaloo RiverRev. Thomas Gilbert was the moderator of the Sarepta Association and a very aged man at the meeting of Falling Creek in 1804. Rev. Gilbert removed from Perquimans County, North Carolina to Franklin County, Georgia and it is said that at one time he owned 100,000 acres of land in North Georgia and Tennessee. He was the first to go to Louisville, Georgia to frame the Constitution for the State of Georgia and he was past the age of 90 years when he died in Hartwell, Georgia on the summit of a beautiful hill overlooking the verdant valley and limpid stream of the Tugaloo River.



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Names of Georgia Ancestors --- > Hart County

Hart County Genealogy Resources, Wills, Estates, Marriages

Lavonia, GeorgiaHartwell, Georgia is near Lake Hartwell, near the South Carolina border of Anderson County. Originally, this area was a series of creeks and branches, however, was flooded to create Lake Hartwell. Therefore, genealogists seeking Georgia ancestors in this vicinity needs to keep this in mind and research all of the surrounding counties as well as the bordering counties of South Carolina. Hart County was created from Elbert and Fannin Counties in 1853. When researching this county, also search the records in Jackson, Franklin and Elbert Counties. Early Settlers: Joe Buffington, John Bowers, D. S. P. Caldwell, R. A. Cobb, George Cauthon, Joseph Ellis, Moses Davis, N. A. Fleetwood, B. S. Higginbotham, John Johnson, Joseph Jackson, William Maxwell, Wyatt McMillan, B. B. Parker, James Reid, Thomas Sanders, Reubin Tyler, John G. Watson and Thomas C. H. White.

Hart County Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Marriages

  • Index to Licenses 1854-1869
  • Index to Licenses 1854=1869

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Indexes to Wills (1847-1894)
  • Inventories, Book B (1862-1890)
  • Annual Returns, Inventories, Sales, Estates, 1859-1863
  • Annual Returns, Inventories, Sales, Estates, 1866-1872
  • Annual Returns, Inventories, Sales, Estates, 1872-1883

Online Images of Hart County Wills (1862-1866)

Note: All of the images in Will Book A were not included because they were too faded to read. Testators: Barr, William;; Black, Robert; Bobo, Burrell; Bowen, Thomas; Bowers, William; Brewer, John; Bruce, Robert; Carnes, Halaway; Carnes, Wells; Clark, John; Cunningham, Franklin; Cunningham, Joseph; Dickinson, John; Dooly, William; Durkey, Malinda; Fleming, Peter; Gaines, William; Goss, Amos; Hendrick, Jesse; Hickman, Middleton; Holland, Thomas; McCurry, John; McMullers, William; Misch, John; Pinson, Sterling; Ray, Thomas; Rice, Francis; Shiflet, John; Smith, Jessie; Teasley, Braly; Tyner, Tollman; Walden, William; White, Essie or Eppy 



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Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Will you Take your Genealogy to Mars? #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Will you Take your Genealogy to Mars?

Space XThere is talk of preparations to establish colonies on Mars as billions of US dollars go to fund the Space-X project of Elon Musk. Musk predicts a permanent base on Mars by the year 2028. The plan is that before that year, robots will be transported to Mars to construct communities. Going to Mars is no longer science-fiction. So, I ask you this question. "If you should go, would you personally take the records of your family and ancestors?" "And, what if you do not and the records of Earth families are forever lost?" It is interesting to note the keen interest of so many people in finding the ancestors. When I was growing up, the Internet was unknown. But the Internet is a mechanical process subjected to hackers from foreign countries and some serious privacy issues yet unsettled. Data gets lost, sold, re-tabulated, and used for nefarious purposes. Tomorrow, the Internet could be gone. We have already lost many irretrievable records due to natural disasters and wars. Thus, the projection of our own descendants ending up on Mars is not too far-fetched. And, it may be that the memory of the human family on Earth would lay in the hands of a few people who trace their genealogy and privately preserve information. Think about it. Latest Space-X updates



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