Wednesday, April 17, 2019

The First Virginia Militia #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The First Virginia Militia

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

The first militia in Virginia was form in 1607, upon the arrival of new settlers from England. After the all-out-war during 1623 of Chief Powhatan against all Virginians and the massacre of a great number of colonists, the Virginia General Assembly gave its command, viz: " that men go not to work in the ground without their arms; That no man go or send abroad without a sufficient partie well armed." Further, during 1661 Governor William Berkeley stated that "All our freemen are bound to be trained every month in their particular counties." Thus, from the very earliest of days, it became necessary to carry guns and protect the colonists and this was done by forming Militia Companies in every inhabited area. The free land grants helped to populate the colony, however, even up unto the 19th century, the Militia was protecting citizens against Indians. It is always a good idea to research the history and time-frame of a given area to understand the situation.



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Georgia Ancestors - - - > Haralson County

Haralson County Wills, Estates, Marriages


Buchanan City Cemetery

Ancestors in Haralson, Meriwether and Troup Counties as settlers were removing into the old Indian lands. From there, they went in Chambers County, Alabama and other surrounding border counties to Georgia. Haralson County was created in 1856 from Carroll and Polk Counties. Early Settlers: Martin Ayers, S. D. Blackman, Dennis Bates, W. J. Crawford, W. H. Chaffee, Vinson Chandler, James Dunn, B. F. Edwards, Walter Foyer, E. F. Garrett, John Humphries, J. C. Jackson, Robert Kilgore, Joseph Little, E. D. E. Pollard, Logan Root, Thomas C. Smith, C. A. Upshaw and Z. T. Williams.

Probate Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Will Book A (1865-1919)
  • Index to Deed Book A.
  • Marriages from newspapers (1885-1886).
  • Index to Appraisements and Sale Bills (1884-1937).
  • Index to Appraisements, Sale Bills, Inventories, Annual Returns (1865-1884).

Online Images of Wills (1865 to 1900)

Testators: Aldridge, Patrick; Aldridge, William; Ayres, Martin; Bachus, James; Bates, Dennis; Bowling, David; Cagle, Benjamin; Crocket, Sarah; Daniel, S. L. M. C.; Davis, John; Edwards, B. F.; Fincher, G. W.; Ford, William ; Goldin, Nathan; Goldin, T. E.; Hamilton, John; Hilton, Amos;Holcombe, Reuben K.; Holcombe, Reuben; Holland, Fallon; Hudson, James; Jennings, William; Johnson, Thomas; Jordan, J. M.; Kilgore, Robert; Lathan, Henry ; Little, S. B.; McClung, S. B. L. J.; Newman, Ephraim; Posey, Sarah Melvin; Powell, Presley; Reid, Reuben; Smith, Lucretia; Summerfield, B. F.; Summerville, Robert; Weatherby, Aaron; Weatherby, Sarah; Westbrooks, James; Whistenhunt, Benjamin, orphans of; Williams, W. N.; Williams, Wyatt; Wilson, Absalom; Woods, Abraham; Young, S. A. E. F.

Online Images of Miscellaneous Superior Court Cases

  • D. L. Drussell vs. H. C. Waldrop
  • Hamilton vs. Langmeade
  • Kenneth Hebrid vs. Duncan Munne
  • P. S. Dean vs. Georgia Pacific Railway
  • P. S. Dean vs. Georgia Pacific Railway
  • Robinson vs. William O. Rour
  • Morris, S. J. vs. Rubin Morris
  • The State vs. John Warren

Online Images of Miscellaneous Deeds

  • Brooks, George to J. W. Bennett
  • Copeland, Etta (Mrs.) to Willie Tolbert Head, et al
  • Head, G. W. (Mrs.) to Mrs. Allice Harrison
  • Head, N. C. R. to W. T. Head Sr.
  • Head, W. T. to George W. Head
  • Pope, A. A. to W. E. Johnson
  • Strickland, S. W. & Co. to Whitlaw Wyatt
  • Watson, Benjamin F. to Fields
  • . . . more . . .



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Tuesday, April 16, 2019

They Traveled Far in Search of a Home #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

They Traveled Far in Search of a Home

Store in Gainesville 1940s
The Loggins family were among those who went West into Augusta and Orange Counties, Virginia. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, John Loggins Sr. enlisted in the 2nd Regiment of the Virginia Line. He was forty-four years of age. Afterward, he removed to Halifax County, Virginia, then on to Union County and Pendleton District, South Carolina. His son, John, also served in the war and made his residence in Hall County. 



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Monday, April 15, 2019

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

Why the War of 1812 is Rarely Discussed

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

merchant marinerThe War of 1812 was mostly a maritime battle fought in the North Atlantic. During the first several months after war was declared, battles were centered around the Middle States. In fact, on October 14th, 1812, the senior naval officer at Charleston, South Carolina, wrote: "Till today this coast has been clear of enemy cruisers; now Charleston is blockaded by three brigs, two very large, and they have captured nine sail within three miles of the bar." Two months he expressed surprise that the inland navigation behind the sea islands had not been destroyed by the enemy, due to its of its lack of defense. In January of 1813, the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay was guarded by a ship of the line, two frigates and a sloop. A commercial blockade had not been established, yet the hostile divisions remained outside and American vessels continued to go out and in around Charleston. A Letter-of-Marque and Reprisal was a government license authorizing a privateer to attack and capture enemy vessels and bring them before the admiralty courts for condemnation and sale. This method of cruising on the high seas for prizes with a Letter-of-Marque was considered an honorable calling because it combined patriotism and profit. Otherwise, captured vessels were done so by "piracy" which was punishable by law. The privateer employed a fast and weatherly fore-and-aft rigged vessel heavily armed and crewed, and its primary objection was for fighting. There existed a robust trade with France by Letters-of-Marque for commercial vessels which carried cargo and guns. By February 12th of 1813, conditions grow worse. The commercial blockade was proclaimed and blockaders entered the Chesapeake while vessels under neutral flags (Spanish and Swedish) were turned away. Two Letter-of-Marque schooners had been captured, one after a gallant struggle during which her captain was killed. Nautical misadventures of that kind became frequent. On April 3rd, three Letters-of-Marque and a privateer, which had entered the Rappahannock, were attacked at anchor. The Letters-of-Marque had smaller crews and thus offered little resistance to boarding, but the privateer, having near a hundred men, made a sharp resistance. The Americans lost six (killed) and ten were wounded, while Britain had two killed and eleven wounded. Source: Sea Power In Its Relations to the War of 1812 by Captain A. T. Mahan, D. C. L., LL. D., United State Navy. (London, 1899) Protecting Georgia During the War of 1812 The Blackshear Trail The War of 1812 in Georgia The Role Georgia Military Forts Played During War of 1812 The Battle of Cold Harbour



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The Migratory Trail into Hall County #georgiapioneerscom #genealogy

The Migratory Trail into Hall County

1880's Store in Gainesville, Georgia
The migratory trail of those persons in Hall County was down from Virginia through Abbeville and Anderson Counties, South Carolina. They were those who drew in the lotteries for the land surrendered by the Cherokee Indians in the Treaties of 1817 and 1819. The first settlers were Scots-Irish, English and German, as well as Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians.



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Thursday, April 11, 2019

The Dress of Planters and their Wives #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The Dress of Planters and their Wives

17th Century Colonial DressIn Colonial Virginia, most articles of dress for well-to-do men and women were imported and London fashions strictly observed. In the time of the Rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon(1676), the gentlemen wore London styles, such as a coat and breeches of olive plush or dark red broadcloth, with embroidered waistcoat, shirt of blue holland, long silk stockings, silver buttons and shoe-buckles, lace ruffles about neck and wrists, and his head encumbered with a flowing wig. The Lady of the house might have worn a crimson satin bodice trimmed with point lace, a black tabby petticoat and silk hose, with shoes of fine leather gallooned; her lace headdress would be secured with a gold bodkin, and she would be apt to wear earrings, a pearl necklace, and finger-rings with rubies or diamonds, and to carry a fan.








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Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Records of Orphans in Georgia #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Records of Orphans in Georgia

Bethesda OrphanageOne of the most difficult genealogical researches is for an orphan. That is because these records were not disclosed to the public. However, a thorough search of old newspapers and census records sometimes contains some interesting information on individual orphans. Collections of Orphans Records





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Special Virginia Collections #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet


Special Collections: Immigrants to Virginia

Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin Genealogy Books by Jeannette Holland Austin

The first settlers to Jamestown were instigated at the instance of Captain John Smith. Apparently, this group of immigrants were vagrants brought in off the street of London and includes adults, boys and girls. Vagrancy is noted and what street or parish they were found in. In some cases the church-wardens brought them in for confinement. The vagrants include adults, boys and girls. The 1619 list includes notes from Capt. John Smith, such as "died" and the occupation. The first settlements into the Virginia colony were fraught with hardship. By 1619, it appears that over half of those sent were dead. The Indian massacre did not occur until 1620 or 1621, however, the Powhatan tribe was unfriendly and the settlers had to defend themselves against attacks. This meant that they could not leave the fort during such attacks and apparently died of hardship and starvation. To see these lists, you must become a member of Virginia Pioneers
  • The Virginia Company of London 1606 to 1624
  • First Settlers to Jamestown in 1607 as noted by Captain John Smith.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1618.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1619.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1620.
  • Immigrants sent from London to Virginia in 1622. 1684 English Merchants residing in Virginia
  • Passinger List of ship Charming Molly to Essex County 1765
  • Immigrants to Middlesex County 1674 to 1702
  • Miscellaneous Immigrants from Virginia Executive Papers
  • Deaths of Members Listed in the Journal of the House of Burgesses 1702 to 1761
Sources: Minutes of the Court of Governors of Bridewell. Microfilm at Bethlem Royal Hospital, monks Orchard Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 3BX, England. Originals at King Edward's School, Witley, Surrey, England and Records of the Virginia Company of London, ed. Susan M. Kingsbury, published for the Library of Congress, 1906-1935; Journal of the Virginia House of Burgesses. 


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The Irish did not Change their Names #ncgenealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Irish did not Change their Names

Tips By Jeannette Holland Austin

Books by Jeannette Holland AustinFrom earliest of immigrants, we find the Irish settlements first to New England, then to the Carolinas, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. During the last century, Maine, New Hampshire, the greater part of Vermont, western Massachusetts, western Pennsylvania, a large portion of Maryland, the western part of Virginia, between the Blue Ridge and the Alleghany mountains, into North Carolina, along the French Broad river, to the upper part of South Carolina, and into the territory now forming Tennessee and Kentucky, with a part of the northwest territory, to the north of the Ohio river, and which then belonged to Virginia, was largely, and in some sections was entirely, settled by Irish. The Irish did not change their names before or after leaving Ireland. The course of settlement can be traced by the surnames of the first settlers and found in Ireland. It might be claimed by some genealogists that certain of these Irish emigrants were of English descent, however, they were Irish by birth. In essence they were the Irish who no longer sympathized with England. Otherwise, they would have remained in the country. Notwithstanding the severe penalties rendered by the English for "taking up with the Irishy," the fate was the same of its invaders. Yet, over time they yielded to the charms of the Irish women, and their progeny became often more Irish than those from the original Celtic stock. Also, the descendants of many the Cromwellian soldiers is found in Ireland. These were the people who became bitter and uncompromising foes to English rule in Ireland. During 1771 and 1773, over twenty-five thousand emigrants left Belfast and other ports in that immediate neighborhood and traveled to the American colonies. They had been evicted from one of the estates of the Marquis of Donegal, in Antrim. They were mostly farmers and manufacturers who converted their property into specie and used the money to transport them abroad. The Irish people throughout this country sympathized with the cause of the colonies, and immediately after the battle of Bunker Hill thousands among them entered the army. Especially the emigrants from the north of Ireland, who, from their continuous service and discipline, became a mainstay of the organization until the end of the war.



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Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Poor Houses and Genealogy #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Poor Houses

workhouseWhen visiting your local court house, it should be remembered that most counties kept a record of poor people and the cost thereof. A search through these old books usually yields a list of names. Other than that, there are other means. Here is a List of the Collection on Georgia Pioneers:
  • Abram Widow's Home, Chatham County, 1860
  • Douglas County Paupers 1871-1890
  • Emanuel County Poor House, 1835 or 1853
  • Savannah Poor House and Hospital, 1850 and 1860
  • The Constitution (newspapers) 1885-1900



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