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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Tracing the Family Tree has its own Special Value

Tracing the Family Tree has its own Special Value

The Task of searching for ancestors can be daunting.  I have been doing it for more than fifty years now.  The massive collectible data of research caused the publication of over 100 books on the subject.  Also, the establishment of 8 Genealogy Websites (recently merged together under Georgia Pioneers.com) consists of over 2 tetabytes.  Yes, I collected images of over 700 million old wills, estates, marriages,  obituaries, cemetery records,  pensions, databases of my books, and 3000+ Traced Families and Special Collections for Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.   You won't find this information anywhere else.  So why do I want to provide a free research service to members of Georgia Pioneers?  I suppose it is because I understand the struggle to find the ancestors and just want to help. To take advantage now, all that you need to do is Become a Member !

Then, email me your request so that I may get to work on it!

Jeannette Austin
georgiapioneers@gmail.com




Testimonials

The free genealogy research which you did for me last year led to my finding my ancestor. Thanks! Mrs. C. C. Hermann

Your free genealogy research helped me tremendously. I plan to renew again with Georgia Pioneers ... Mrs. Jennie Swan

I need help. Is the free genealogy help still available to members?. ... Lonnie G. R. Brown



Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

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The Approach to Finding South Carolina Families #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy

The Approach to Finding South Carolina Families

Berne, SwitzerlandThe best way to find South Carolina families during the 18th century is to search for surviving church records and written histories for arrival dates and places, including the names of certain religious groups and their ministers. It is a study of the new emerging religious groups which were undergoing a rather dramatic and far-reaching change and Reformation. For example, a Calvinist of Lutheran church might ultimately reform to Presbyterian. The era of Reformation had its issues, so it is best to better inform oneself in order to grasp what was happening and where to search next.

Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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"Thanks to everyone who has sent their brick wall for me to work on thus far. I am enjoying the challenge! There are so many interesting factors in this work, from the ports of immigration and the various settlements in America to families of more recent times. If you have not yet taken advantage, please do so now. JOIN now for free brick wall help Then send me your information. Members, please MEMBERS CLICK HERE to view the results of this work as you may share the same families!" Jeannette Holland Austin

Results of Free Research to Members of 8 Genealogy Websites --- > Young of GA and MS



Task: Find the Father of Franklin Young

The links will work  for members of 8 Genealogy Websites.

Unless proven otherwise, it appears that Franklin Young was born in Wilkes County Georgia and was the son of Patrick Young.

A review of the 1820 to 1830 Mississippi Census records discloses the following:

1820 Pike County Derrell Young - male 26 to 45; female 16 to 26 (born 1774-1792)
Patrick Young - male 26 to 45; female under 10; female 16 to 26 (born 1774-1792) 1830 Claiborne County Derrill Young
Patrick Young 

The above information comes from a "printed" index. The original 1820 Pike for Patrick Young is difficult to read and needs personal examination, to see if there was a son under 10 (instead of a female). 

Patrick Young drew in the 1807 Georgia Land Lottery, a resident of Wilkes County. This is "the only Young" in Georgia who went to Pike County MS. There were no deeds or any other records of him in Wilkes County, Georgia. According to the Census Record, Patrick Young was born between 1775 and 1792. He had to be aged 21 to draw in the land lottery, therefore, it is more accurate to say that he was born ca 1786. 

Family Search has a rather detailed lineage of Thomas Calvin Young Sr. born June 4 1759 in Orangeburg, SC, died 1810, married Hannah Patrick. Children; John, Henry, Elizabeth, Thomas Calvin Jr., William, Patrick, Derrell and Judith. Source records are tax records 1786 and 1790 Orangeburg County Census. Elizabeth Young married Isaac Carter as detailed in the Source Records from Pike County MS by Conerly The Orangeburg County Census records must have burned. To prove the Calvin Young Sr. entry and confirm this lineage, we need to see deeds, estates and wills in Orangeburg County which do not exist. Nevertheless, it appears that we are on the right track.

Additionally, there is a Thomas Young who died 1810 in Wilkes County, WB HH, p. 31 who names his heirs as Elizabeth, Samuel, David, William R., Nancy, Polly, Elizabeth and Susan. Clearly, this Thomas is not the father of Patrick Young. Yet he may be a distant relative. 

Research: Claiborne and Pike Counties, MS; 1820-30 MS Census Records; Georgia Land Lotteries; Wilkes County Georgia Wills, Estates, Deeds. I have limited access to MS records.

Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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Names of SC Ancestors --- > Charleston County


Charleston County Wills, Estates, Guardianships, Deeds, Affidavits 1670 to 1868

Charleston and Charleston County represent the earliest productive economy in South Carolina. English settlers arrived in the colony as early as 1670 and established a town at Albemarle Point on the west bank of the Ashley River. Then Charles Town, named in honor of King Charles II of England, was built a few miles away between the Ashley and Cooper rivers. Charles Town (renamed Charleston in 1783) was the political, social, and economic center of the South throughout the colonial period, becoming the antebellum capitol of the state capital until 1790. Charleston District was formed in 1769, but portions were later split off to form Colleton (1800) and Berkeley (1882) counties. Charleston County of today includes the old parishes of St. Philip, St. Michael, Christ Church, St. Andrew, St. John Colleton, and part of St. James Santee. It was the English and French Huguenot settlers and their African slaves who established the prosperous rice and cotton plantations of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In fact, some of the first Georgia colonials ran away to Charleston so that they could establish agricultural plantations using slave labor. In essence, Charleston represented civilization to the colonials. In June of 1776, Charleston found itself embroiled in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War and handily defeated the attacking British fleet. A palmetto log ... more ...


Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

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Names of SC Ancestors --- > Barnwell County


Barnwell County Wills, Marriages, Maps

Barnwell, South CarolinaBarnwell County was originally part of Orangeburg District, and in 1785 it was named Winton County. It was given its current name in 1800 when it was named for John Barnwell (1748-1800), a Revolutionary War Leader. Barnwell County has decreased in size over the years as new counties were created within its boundaries (Aiken in 1871, Bamberg in 1897 and Allendale in 1919). The South Carolina Railroad, which connected Charleston to Hamburg on the Savannah River, was built through this area, creating the towns of Blackville and Williston in the mid-nineteenth century. 

Early settlers to Orangeburg District: Robert McCampbell, Gabriel Moffitt, W. H. Lacy, Nathaniel Perry, and others. 

Barnwell County Probate Records Available to members of South Carolina Pioneers
  • Index to Barnwell County Wills (1787-1826)
  • Index to Barnville County Wills (1787-1856)
  • Barnwell County Marriages
  • Barnwell County Wills (abstracted) 1778-1810
  • Barnwell County Wills (abstracted) 1811-1820 . . . more . . .
  • Barnwell County Wills (abstracted) 1821-1840
  • Barnwell County Wills (abstracted) 1841-1856
  • 1825 Map of Barnwell District

Transcripts of Miscellaneous Wills and Estates (1787-1798)

Testators: Abney, Nathaniel; Adams, William; Alexander, Raine ; Ashley, Nathaniel; Bassett, William; Bates, Andrew; Blitchendon, John; Bowie, James; Boyit, William; Brown, Tarlton, Estate, 1845; Browne, Charles; Bryant, John; Burnley, John; Bush, John; Cannon, Reddin; 



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When Genealogy Points to a Study of Religion #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy


When Genealogy Points to a Study of Religion

Palatinate

Few passenger lists of the early German settlers from the lower Palatine regions of Germany into Philadelphia survived. They were probably the largest concentration of immigrants who came to America. However, we have to remember that the Palatines spoke German and for this reason established their own communities. From about 1735 to 1752 most of these people were Germans from the Palatines and Switzerland and they were usually acccompanied by their ministers. Take special note of the names of the ministers and search for possible church records or log books. Their religion was being reformed into Presbyterian and Lutheran. In addition to the large Palatine movement coming to America during the 18th century, the Scotch-Irish were also landing in Philadelphia, taking the Wagon Road into Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The reason that we cannot find records is because they spoke German and Gaelic. In many instances, they were so poor that they could not read nor write. Thus, as pioneers clanned together in the back woods, they lived amongst their own kind. Church records kept by the ministers was probably the only public data concerning their marriages, births and deaths. If you can find it. The South Carolina Gazette sometimes published information concerning the arrivals from foreign shores which provided the arrival date in South Carolina, and place. These are the sort of things to become familiar with. and Switzerland and they were usually accompanied by their ministers. Take special note of the names of the ministers and search for possible church records or log books. Their religion was being reformed into Presbyterian and Lutheran. In addition to the large Palatine movement coming to America during the 18th century, the Scotch-Irish were also landing in Philadelphia, taking the Wagon Road into Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The reason that we cannot find records is because they spoke German and Gaelic. In many instances, they were so poor that they could not read nor write. Thus, as pioneers settled together in the back woods, they lived amongst their own kind. Church records kept by the ministers was probably the only public data concerning their marriages, births and deaths. If you can find it. The South Carolina Gazette sometimes published information concerning the arrivals from foreign shores which provided the arrival date in South Carolina, and place. These are the sort of things to become familiar with.

Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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"Thanks to everyone who has sent their brick wall for me to work on thus far. I am enjoying the challenge! There are so many interesting factors in this work, from the ports of immigration and the various settlements in America to families of more recent times. If you have not yet taken advantage, please do so now. JOIN now for free brick wall help Then send me your information. Members, please MEMBERS CLICK HERE to view the results of this work as you may share the same families!" Jeannette Holland Austin

Monday, October 15, 2018

Alexander Cleveland House in Ruckersville GA #georgiapioneerscom

The Alexander Cleveland House in Ruckersville

Alexander Cleveland HouseAlexander-Cleveland House is located near Ruckersville, Georgia. An old home from the early days. Many such dilapidated homes as this one are depicted in the Georgia countryside landscape. It it is worth the time and effort to take in hand an old county map and (using the legend) try and locate the old home place as well as cemeteries hidden in the grass. 
Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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Names of Kentucky Ancestors --- > Montgomery County

Montgomery County Wills, Estates, Guardianships


Montgomery County Kentucky

Montgomery County was established in 1796 from land taken from by Clark County. Montgomery County was named in honor of Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War Brigadier General who was killed in 1775 while attempting to capture Quebec City, Canada. The county seat is Mount Sterling. 

Genealogy Records available to Members of Kentucky Pioneers

Book A, 1797-1812

Allen, John *Anderson, Nicholas *Armstrong, Thomas *Beacraft, James *Bell, William *Bell, Zachariah *Bledsoe, Moses *Boone, Jacob *Bracken, Robert *Branson, David *Brinser, David *Bumgardner, Bum *Butler, Thomas *Caldwell, John *Cantell, Joshua *Carmen, Henry *Carson, William *Clark, James *Collins, Joseph *Colliver, Joseph *Darnatt, John *Davis, Ignatius *Davis, Nathaniel *Davis, Thomas *Dewitt, Barnet *Dewitt, Barnett Sr. *Dewitt, Martin *Downings, James *Downings, Samuel *Duncan, Isaac *Elliott, John *England, David *Erwin, John *Ewings, Joshua *Fletcher, Thomas *Forbest, Hugh *Furled, Anthony *Goodson, Duncan *Hall, Robert *Harris, Joseph *Harrow, Samuel *Hart, William *Hensley, Joseph *Hensley, Samuel *Hicks, Alexander *Hodge, John H. *Honaker, Peter *Hopper, William *Jenkins, James H. *Jennings, William *Johnson, Edmund *Kelly, Alexander *Kennedy, James *Lancaster, Benjamin *Lane, William *Lawson, Elijah *Lenigor, Joseph *Loe, Polly *Maxy, Thomas *Mayberry, Lewis *Mays, Thomas *Meteer, William *Mitchel, John *Mitchell, John *Norris, William *Northcut, Jeremiah *Oakley, Benjamin *Owings, Jeptha *Parker, Peter *Parks, James *Pebbler, Jane *Pritchard, Phillip *Ragan, William *Rice, Fleming *Richardson, Jonathan *Ringo, Henry *Robertson, Robert *Robertson, William *Robinson, Hugh *Robinson, John *Robinson, William *Rodgers, John *Saul, William *Shutts, Henry *Sidner, Lawrence *Smith, Joseph *Steel, Robert *Stewart, David *Stewart, Benjamin *Taylor, Francis *Thompson, William *Todd, William *Trotter, Richard *Turner, Joseph *Varnars, Cornelius *Wells, Euclid *Wilkinson, Moses *Williams, John *Williams, Joseph *Wills, James *Wools, Christopher *Young, Robert *Young, S. *Young, William 

Book B, 1813 to 1822

*Adams, Mathew *Allen, John *Allen, William *Allison, William *Anderson, John *Anthony, David *Barker, Thomas *Barnard, John *Barr, William *Barron, David *Batts, Joseph *Bealy, Thomas *Beecraft, James *Belk, William *Bell, William *Biggers, William *Bleak, John *Bledsoe, Moses *Blythe, Charley *Bridges, William *Brothers, Absalom *Brothers, Thomas *Brown, Mary Ann *Budle, David *Bumgarner, George *Caldbreath, John *Callaway, Elizabeth *Callaway, Richard *Cannon, Henry *Carrington, Samuel *Case, James *Case, Samuel *Cockran, William *Coffer, Henry *Collewin, Joseph *Conley,  more names

Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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Names of Georgia Ancestors --- > Coweta County #georgiapioneerscom

Coweta County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Maps


Newnan, GeorgiaThe Creek Indians ceded the land in Lee, Muscogee, Troup, Coweta, and Carroll counties in the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs where Chief McIntosh was killed because of it. The counties' boundaries were created by the Georgia General Assembly on June 9, 1826, but they were not named until December 14, 1826. Coweta County was named for the Koweta Indians (a sub-group of the Creek people), who had several towns in and around present day Coweta. Researchers should also research Henry, Fayette and Spalding Counties.

Cowets County Genealogy Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Wills

  • Wills 1827 to 1847 (abstracts)
  • Wills 1849 to 1885 (abstracts)
  • Wills 1885 to 1910 (abstracts)

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Will Book A, 1828 to 1848
  • Will Book B, 1848 to 1892
  • Annual Returns, Book B, 1837 to 1843

Marriages

  • 1827 to 1849
  • Marriages from newspapers 1885 to 1886

Miscellaneous Records

  • Cates, Asa, 1853, Deed of the Legatees

Maps

  • Map of Coweta County

Traced Genealogies of Coweta County Families

  • Bull
  • Dyer
  • Hunnicutt
  • McClendon
  • Neely
  • Simms
Comments are welcome..




Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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Saturday, October 13, 2018

The Shut Down of Google + Affects Genealogy

The Shut Down of Google +

The devotion to social media is becoming tedious.  We are seeing our work go down the drain. The time and effort used to build communities and friendships is evaporating into a fine mist of nothing.  Google + has announced that it shutting down its social media program. 
Unfortunately, we genealogists have already lost most of our Facebook contacts.  Unless you want to continuously pay for Facebook "boosts", looks like the hey day of sharing family history via Facebook is in a down hill mud spiral. 
And the crashing down is not over.  If you have inserted FB and Google+ icons on your web page, it is time to remove them.  Perhaps this is a bitter lesson for not adding fad media buttons.

I am urging my contacts to stay in touch by joining the Genealogy History Blog <join  link> where a great deal of helpful tips and historical information is provided daily.  Indeed, you will learn the names of persons who left wills and estates for a number of States and Counties, as well as some interesting details concerning historical events in which your ancestors participated.   Just tons of information is available on this blog!   

Also, there is a new social media out there Mastodon which is free of ads and easy to post. I will be happy to answer genealogy questions on Mastodon.social.   Actually, if it catches on, this is a good posting media for genealogists who are anxious to share and/or searching for answers. 




Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

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